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Please visit our newly updated website at http://www.facialfitnesssystem.com to learn more about the global phenomenon Facial Fitness System!

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OIL CLEANSING METHOD

“The Oil Cleansing Method” is a techniques commonly used in Japan which uses oils such as castor oil to draw out dirt and other impurities from their pores, and extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), which is a brilliant moisturizer, to help heal and nourish the skin. Here’s how it’s done.

For normal skin, combine one part EVOO to one part castor oil in a small bottle and shake. For oily skin, combine three parts castor oil to one part EVOO, and for dry skin. combine one part castor oil and three parts EVOO.

To begin, pour a quarter-sized amount of the combined oils into your palm, rub your hand together, and slowly massage into the face and neck for about a minute.

Next, wet a washcloth with hot water (not scalding), and place it over the face for a few moments until it begins to cool. This will steam out your pores, removing the impurities and dead skin cells. Finally, thoroughly rinse the washcloth out with hot water, wring, then gently wipe off any excess oil. Your skin will feel softer, look brighter, and won’t feel tight or greasy. Olive oil has the same pH as human skin so it is a perfect cleansing balancer.

Finally, thoroughly rinse the washcloth with hot water, wring, then gently wipe off any excess oil. Your skin will feel softer, look brighter, won’t feel tight or greasy. Olive oil has the same pH as human skin so it is the perfect cleansing balancer.

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•Shop the perimeter of the grocery store. That’s where you’ll find the freshest, least processed products in the store — the fresh fruits and vegetables and all–natural dairy and meats.

•Buy organic foods as often as possible. Avoid pesticides by choosing fresh produce and dairy that’s certified organic and pesticide free. Farmers’ markets are often a great source of fresh, organic produce, often at reduced prices.

•Grow your own food. You’ll get the freshest, most delicious fruits and vegetables that way — and they’ll be guaranteed to be chemical free!

•Wash nonorganic produce carefully. Use a good vegetable wash to remove toxins, or soak them for 20 minutes in water with salt and fresh lemon juice or vinegar.

•Avoid high–pesticide foods. If you can’t afford to buy everything organic, strategize by buying organic versions of the “dirty dozen,” the fruits and vegetables that when grown conventionally are loaded with pesticides and chemicals. These include grapes, peaches, lettuce, strawberries, apples, pears, bell peppers, kale, carrots, celery, and nectarines.

•Ask about the origins of your meat and seafood. If you can afford it, insist on organic or at least natural, hormone–free beef and chicken, and choose wild–caught fish, not farmed.

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By Patricia Goroway

We’ve been hearing the term “Runner’s Face” on various talk shows a lot lately, but this condition has been around as long as people have been strenously exercising, running for fitness or extreme dieting for weight loss. Dr. Brian S. Glatt, a board-certified plastic surgeon in New Jersey, explains the skinny, Skeletor-esque look that often develops.

“Runner’s face generally occurs in both men and women ages 30+ who exercise to improve their body, and in doing so end up with a skeletal and bony face. When exercising, an athlete burns off fat beneath the layers of his/her skin. The marked loss of fatty tissue results in a loss of volume in the face which leads to a prominent appearance of the bones, accelerated development of skin laxity and deepening of wrinkles. Though you may look like a 20-year-old from the neck down—your face will easily give away your age”.

Give it away or excellerate it for certain! But what can be done to prevent this horrific effect? The answer is a healthy diet, preventive care, and a specific facial exercise routine designed with “Dynamic Tension” to combat the affects of the constant and exaggerated gravitational pull experienced while running or during strenuous exercise.

The low fat or no fat diets that often accompany many of these athelete’s exercise regimens, further exasperates the condition, as well. The body needs fat, preferably good fat in small amounts, daily to keep the skin looking healthy and the hair lustrious. Following a healthy well-balanced diet while exercising is essential in combatting this dreaded look.

And let’s not forget that most runner’s (and biker’s for that matter) do so outdoors. Extrinsic aging is responsible for most of the visible signs of prematurely aged skin. With repeated exposure to the sun, the skin loses the ability to repair itself. Healthy, nourished, well protected skin, produces both collagen and elastin, but as we age this process slows down and is dramatically accelerated by repeated exposure to the sun’s harmful rays.

It is essential to limit the skin’s exposure and to protect it while it is being exposed by using protective clothing, and a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection facor) of fifteen or higher that contain both a UVA and UVB protection applied liberally and often during excercise.

This may not be so easy while running or bikeing a marathon or long distance, and so reapplying is often overlooked.

Visit http://www.facialfitnesssystems for more information and tips on how to prevent and reverse the effects of “Runner’s Face”.

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How to Prevent “Runner’s Face”By Patricia Goroway

We’ve been hearing the term “Runner’s Face” on various talk shows a lot lately, but this condition has been around as long as people have been strenously exercising, running for fitness or extreme dieting for weight loss. Dr. Brian S. Glatt, a board-certified plastic surgeon in New Jersey, explains the skinny, Skeletor-esque look that often develops.

“Runner’s face generally occurs in both men and women ages 30+ who exercise to improve their body, and in doing so end up with a skeletal and bony face. When exercising, an athlete burns off fat beneath the layers of his/her skin. The marked loss of fatty tissue results in a loss of volume in the face which leads to a prominent appearance of the bones, accelerated development of skin laxity and deepening of wrinkles. Though you may look like a 20-year-old from the neck down—your face will easily give away your age”.

Give it away or excellerate it for certain! But what can be done to prevent this horrific effect? The answer is a healthy diet, preventive care, and a specific facial exercise routine designed with “Dynamic Tension” to combat the affects of the constant and exaggerated gravitational pull experienced while running or during strenuous exercise.

The low fat or no fat diets that often accompany many of these athelete’s exercise regimens, further exasperates the condition, as well. The body needs fat, preferably good fat in small amounts, daily to keep the skin looking healthy and the hair lustrious. Following a healthy well-balanced diet while exercising is essential in combatting this dreaded look.

And let’s not forget that most runner’s (and biker’s for that matter) do so outdoors. Extrinsic aging is responsible for most of the visible signs of prematurely aged skin. With repeated exposure to the sun, the skin loses the ability to repair itself. Healthy, nourished, well protected skin, produces both collagen and elastin, but as we age this process slows down and is dramatically accelerated by repeated exposure to the sun’s harmful rays.

It is essential to limit the skin’s exposure and to protect it while it is being exposed by using protective clothing, and a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection facor) of fifteen or higher that contain both a UVA and UVB protection applied liberally and often during excercise.

This may not be so easy while running or bikeing a marathon or long distance, and so reapplying is often overlooked.

Visit http://www.facialfitnesssystems for more information and tips on how to prevent and reverse the effects of “Runner’s Face”.

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